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Thoughts on Poetry, Books, and Life

Poetry Friday: Welcome to the Farm!

poetry friday logo

Welcome, friends! It’s Poetry Friday and I’m honored to be your host today! Best of all, my sister and nephews are here visiting from Texas, so there’s a lot going on around here today! (There’s an Inlinkz widget at the bottom of the post for your links. We’ve gone fishin’!)

When Mark and I selected “Prairie Blossom Bee Farm” as the name for our honey business, we had modest plans for a few hives as a hobby to do together. We now have about 35 hives (including 4 on the front porch — 3 swarms this year so far!) and, as regular readers know, we’ve added chickens this year. So, welcome to our busy, buzzy, clucking farm! Have an egg!

 

eggs_july_2015

To kick off our poetry celebration, please grab your sun hat and join Irene Latham for a finely crafted look at this important word.

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Thank you, Irene! Your incredible talent and generosity brighten our Poetry Friday community . . . and also adorn my fridge. 🙂

**Update at 2:01 p.m. CST: Disregard the very first link — there’s a missing hyphen and April fixed it/reposted on No. 12 . . . from California! She’s at the SCBWI conference. WOOT!

We went fishing this morning, and were blessed with the coolest temperatures in 3 weeks — it was breezy and in the 70s. WOOT WOOT!

Thanks to everyone for your wonderful participation and kind comments. xoxoxo

 

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14 thoughts on “Poetry Friday: Welcome to the Farm!”

  1. Sally Murphy says:

    Thanks for hosting Poetry Friday and thanks for the farm poem. By chance, yesterday I read Dia Calhoun’s Eva of the Farm, a wonderful verse novel about a girl’s connection to the family farm, and more.

  2. Diane Mayr says:

    Lovely poem and collage from Irene!

    What a variety of eggs you’ve shown–do you eat them all yourselves?

  3. Linda Baie says:

    Irene’s poem is lovely, farm indeed is a ‘hard-working word’. An aunt and uncle called their chickens who laid such eggs “Easter Egg Chickens”, nice memories for me, Keri & Irene. Thanks for hosting. I’ll link up later.

  4. Sounds like you have a nice little project going there, Keri – a veritable beehive of activity! And are those Ameraucanas or Araucanas you have?

  5. Hope you’re having fun with visiting family! Bees and chickens, oh, my! And this beautiful poem from Irene. I love these word poems, and Irene does them wonderfully. “it gives and gives and grows.” Love. Just like family!

    Happy Poetry Friday, Keri, and thanks for hosting!

  6. Keri! Thanks for sharing your farm bounty, for hosting and for Irene’s juicy poem and collage.

    TeachingAuthors has been doing a series on Summer Learning Opportunities.

    I’ve been going to the SCBWI National Conference for 24-ish years. My post today is called: 3 things I’ve learned About Conferences & Me

    Also in today’s post (which goes live on Friday morning): a wonderful poem by Richard Wilbur called The Writer. I hope it inspires (the linky thing didn’t have one of the hyphens…my mistake…so I’ve linked it again:

    http://www.teachingauthors.com/2015/07/3-things-ive-learned-about-conferences.html
    (goes live Friday morning)

    Cheerio ~
    April Halprin Wayland

  7. Tabatha says:

    Fantastic poem by Irene!! Thanks for hosting today, Keri. Hope the fishing is good :-)!

  8. I love the name you chose for your honey business. If I saw that on a label I would grab a jar of honey for sure. Do you include the honeycomb in your honey? I have fond childhood memories of honeycomb. My aunt and uncle from Texas always brought us quart jars with the beautiful honeycomb. Almost too pretty to eat.

    Thanks for sharing Irene’s poem. My favorite words- “Good-Gracious rains”. Genius!

    Thanks for hosting Keri. I have guests Cathy Ballou Mealey and her daughter, Grace, collaborating today on A Great Nephew and a Great Aunt.

  9. Tara says:

    What a gorgeous poem by Irene…and glorious eggs, too!

  10. Irene Latham says:

    I love the name of your honey business! My sister’s farm also includes honey… their last name is Baker, and their labels say “Crazy B Honey.” Pretty cute. 🙂 I’m so glad you enjoyed the hardworking poem… I have been a farmer at times in my life… visiting your blog reminds me of all those rich experiences the farm life brings. (now I just go to the farmers’ market. ) Thank you! xo

  11. Irene is a master at the just right word. I love the line “Sometimes it lays green eggs.” it matches your picture of eggs. I have a hen in my WIP so I am quite partial to them. Thanks for hosting. I’ll be back later to post.

  12. “Good-gracious rains”

    Good-gracious poet! That Irene!

    What a gift of a poem, a gift you received and gave over back to us. Thank you, Keri, for this nourishing and lovely post. I love coming over to your place.

    xo

  13. Joyce Ray says:

    Keri, thanks for hosting and sharing Irene’s wonderful farm poem/collage. I love “It bleats and crows and moos.” And yes, “Good-Gracious rains” is genius! Thank you for working to save and provide bees for our environment and farms. Our daughter has chickens next door and we’re gifted with healthy eggs! Enjoy!

  14. Keri, I loved the opening of your post today. The eggs are so different and fresh looking. I have never seen a green egg so that was quite unusual. Prairie Blossom Bee Farm sounds like such a fun place to live. Thank you for sharing Irene’s colorful collage and wonderful poem. Farm life is indeed hard work. I learned this when growing up in central New York where the dairy farms were plentiful. This weekend we are traveling to Cape May, New Jersey. The restaurant, Louisa’s, that we are eating at wa “established in 1980 as one of Cape May’s first farm to table restaurants.” I hope to visit Beach Plum Farm that supplies the food for the restaurant and take some photos.

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